Thursday, August 28, 2008

How The Brain Compensates For Vision Loss Shows Much More Versatility Than Previously Recognized

image of brainScienceDaily
"Previous research has found that when vision is lost, a person's senses of touch and hearing become enhanced. But exactly how this happens has been unclear. Now a long-term study from the Berenson-Allen Center for Noninvasive Brain Stimulation at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) demonstrates that sudden and complete loss of vision leads to profound – but rapidly reversible -- changes in the visual cortex. These findings, reported in the August 27 issue of the journal PLOS One, not only provide new insights into how the brain compensates for the loss of sight, but also suggest that the brain is more adaptable than originally thought."

To view this entire article, please click the title above.

New Hope for Stroke Patients: Reversing Stroke Damage By Jumpstarting Growth of Nerve Fibers

image of nerve cellScienceDaily
"If a stroke patient doesn't get treatment within approximately the first three hours of symptoms, there's not much doctors can do to limit damage to the brain. But now researchers report a technique that potentially could restore functions to patients weeks or even months after a stroke. The technique involves jumpstarting the growth of nerve fibers to compensate for brain cells destroyed by the stroke.

"In the best-case scenario, this would open up the window of time that people could recover and go back to normal functional status," said Gwendolyn Kartje, MD, Ph.D., a professor in the department of cell biology, neurobiology and anatomy and department of neurology at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine in Maywood, Ill. and chief of neuroscience research at Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital in Hines, Ill."

To view this entire article, please click the title above

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

How Diet, Antioxidants Prevent Blindness in Aging Population

scientist
A new study reveals part of the magic behind a diet rich in antioxidants, showing how artichokes, blueberries and pecans can hold at bay the leading cause of age-related blindness in developed countries.

Researchers at Brigham Young University and Weill Medical College of Cornell University discovered a link between two processes in the retina that, in combination, contribute to a disease called macular degeneration. They found antioxidants disrupt the link and extend the lifetime of irreplaceable photoreceptors and other retinal cells.

"The implication is that people at risk of macular degeneration could help prevent the disease by consuming antioxidants,” said Heidi Vollmer-Snarr, a BYU chemist who earned a doctorate from Oxford and began work on this disease as a postdoctoral researcher at Columbia.

To read this entire article, please click the title above.

Tuesday, August 26, 2008

SCATP Fall 2008 Training Schedule

image of man training dog

* Wednesday, September 10, 2008 - The Wonderful World of Word
* Tuesday, September 16, 2008 - Active
Learning and Study Strategies using the Kurzweil 3000 Software
* Tuesday, September 16, 2008 - Introduction to the knfbReader Mobile
* Thursday, September 18, 2008 - Trash to AT Treasures
* Friday, September 19, 2008 - Creation,
Analysis and Remediation of PDF Documents for Accessibility
* Thursday, September 25, 2008 - Boardmaker Basics and Beyond (Columbia)
* Thursday, October 2, 2008 - Bridging the
Telecommunications Gap for Hearing or Speech
Impaired Individuals in South Carolina
* Tuesday, October 14, 2008 - Introduction to SpringBoard Lite
* Thursday, October 16, 2008 - Boardmaker Basics and Beyond (Charleston)
* Thursday, October 23, 2008 - Excel with Excel!
* Wednesday, November 5, 2008 - “AAC Goals
for Interaction: Talking with Others” (DynaVox and Mayer-Johnson)
----------------------------------------------

Wednesday, September 10, 2008 - "The Wonderful World of Word"
8:30am * 12:30pm
Fast Forward Community Technology Center, 3223 Devine Street, Columbia
Presenter: Elizabeth Bagley, Ed.D., Client Advocate, Learn.com

Microsoft Word has a number of features that many
people don’t realize are available. The potential
for Word to enhance student learning is
immeasurable. Students with learning disabilities
all learn differently and Word can be adapted to
cater to each student’s individual learning
style. Word can help empower and engage students
as they take on new tasks. (Note: This workshop
is being taught in Word 2003. Similar features in
Word 2007 may be accessed differently.)

----------------------

Tuesday, September 16, 2008 - Active Learning and
Study Strategies using the Kurzweil 3000 Software
1:00 PM * 2:30 PM
Poplar Conference Room, Midlands Center, Columbia, SC
Presenter: Edna Beard, Quintex of Asheville
Kurzweil Consultant and Distributor in the Carolinas

If you already have Kurzweil 3000 or are just
thinking about purchasing it * this workshop will
help to clarify just how the Kurzweil 3000 can be
used to help struggling students. The Kurzweil
3000 is a content-independent reading, writing,
and learning software. It is used in elementary
schools, middle schools, high schools and
colleges and universities to help students
succeed in the classroom regardless of their curriculum or lesson plans.

Tuesday, September 16, 2008 - Introduction to the knfbReader Mobile”
2:30 PM * 3:00 PM
Poplar Conference Room, Midlands Center, Columbia, SC

Presenter: Edna Beard, Quintex of Asheville
knfbReader Mobile Distributor in the Carolinas

The knfbReader Mobile is a phone that reads to
you * a truly pocket-size solution to reading on
the go. This is a major advancement in
portability and functionality of print access for
blind, the visually impaired, and those with
reading difficulties. The knfbReader Mobile and
kReader Mobile software packages run on a
multifunction cell phone which allows the user to
read mail, receipts, handouts, and many other
documents wherever the user happens to be. The
knfbReader Mobile software has a feature set
which is designed for use by blind or low-vision
users. The kReader Mobile is designed for users
who have difficulty reading due to learning or
language problems. The presenter will demonstrate
the functions of this truly amazing technology.

Thes workshops are free of charge, but is limited to 16 attendees.

----------------------

Thursday, September 18, 2008 - "Trash to AT Treasures"
8:00am * 11:30am
Assistive Technology Resource Room, Midlands Center, Columbia
Presenters: Carol Page O’Day, PhD, CCC-SLP, ATP,
SC Assistive Technology Program, USC School of
Medicine-Center for Disability Resources;
Patricia Quattlebaum, MSP, CCC-SLP, Developmental
Pediatric Clinic, USC School of Medicine-Center for Disability Resources

Many assistive technology devices are available
for communication, switch access, computer
access, activities of daily living, and literacy.
Assistive technology devices can be very
expensive, but they don’t always have to be. Many
examples of how to make assistive technology
devices using common objects around the home will
be demonstrated. The fundamentals of
appropriately selecting and using various
assistive technology devices will also be
reviewed. The workshop will conclude with a
make-and-take opportunity for participants to
choose from different projects to construct and
then take the finished product home with them.

Target Group: Speech-language pathologists,
special-education teachers, occupational therapists, parents and caregivers.

-----------------------

Friday, September 19, 2008 - Accessible PDFs!
Making PDF Documents User Friendly and Geared for Accessibility
8:30am - 4:00 pm
South Carolina Archives and History Auditorium
8301 Parklane Road
Columbia, S C 29223 Presenter: Jon Brundage, Jon Brundage and Associates

Cost: Free. Limited to 200 attendees.

Join Jon Brundage as he addresses the creation,
analysis and remediation of PDF Documents for
accessibility. Discover the potential barriers to
accessibility that Adobe Portable Document Files
(PDF) pose. Gain an understanding of PDF
technology. Learn to create source files that
convert to accessible PDFs. Explore the tools
available in Acrobat Professional for analyzing,
tagging, updating and making existing PDF files accessible.

Target audience: Anyone who creates, maintains,
distributes, examines, or develops PDFs for the
web or as document storage files. Focus will be
on Acobat versions starting at 7 and higher (the
version that added accessibility tools).

-----------------------

Thursday, September 25, 2008 - Boardmaker Basics and Beyond
9:00am * Noon
Assistive Technology Resource Room, Midlands Center, Columbia

Presenters: Carol Page O’Day, PhD, CCC-SLP, ATP,
SC Assistive Technology Program, USC School of
Medicine-Center for Disability Resources; Stacy
Springer, MS, OTR/L, ATP, Assistive Technology
Specialist, SC Department of Education

If you are new to using Boardmaker software, or
need more information about the latest version,
this training session is for you. The training
incorporates a combination of hands-on use and
functional application with Boardmaker Plus!
Software. Basic Boardmaker functions and the
additional functions found in the Plus! version
will be reviewed. Boardmaker Plus! is a drawing
program combined with a graphics database that
also has the ability to talk and play recorded
sounds and movies. This interactive component
allows users to create talking activity boards,
worksheets, schedules, books, writing activities, and more.

Cost: Free! This class has a maximum of 18 participants.

-----------------------

Thursday, October 2, 2008 - Bridging the
Telecommunications Gap for Hearing or Speech
Impaired Individuals in South Carolina
9:00am * 12:30pm
Assistive Technology Resource Room, Midlands Center, Columbia

Presenter: Anne G. Bader, Outreach Coordinator
for the South Carolina Telecommunications
Equipment Distribution Program (SC TEDP)

SC TEDP is a state supported program managed by
the S. C. Office of Regulatory Staff and
administered by the S. C. School for the Deaf and
the Blind. SC TEDP is aware of the daily
challenges facing individuals who are hearing or
speech impaired. Telecommunications equipment
distributed by SC TEDP is carefully chosen to
cover their various needs, and is distributed at
no cost to qualifying South Carolinians.
Qualifying disabilities are: hard-of-hearing,
deaf, deaf-blind, blind/low vision with hearing
loss, or speech impaired. Emphasis is placed on
helping individuals become more independent
through use of this free, state supported
program. SC TEDP classes are presented on Power
Point to facilitate a stress-free learning
environment for attendees who are deaf or
hard-of-hearing. ALS interpreters are available upon request.

-----------------------

Tuesday, October 14, 2008 - Introduction to SpringBoard Lite
9:00am * 12:30pm
Poplar Conference Room, Poplar Building, at Midlands Center in Columbia

Presenter: Gina Greene, M.S.P., CCC-SLP, Regional
Consultant/Augmentative Communication Specialist, Prentke Romich Company

This 3 hour course introduces you to the
operation of the SpringBoard Lite and will
discuss implementation strategies. Participants
will learn how to store text, create, modify and
link activities and pages, and make a talking
photo album. If your device is any color other
than red and has a handle you need to take this
SpringBoard Lite training. For those participants
using the PASS software, you will need the PASS
software that has the date of January 1, 2008 or after.

This class is limited to 12 attendees.

-----------------------

Thursday, October 16, 2008 - Boardmaker Basics and Beyond
9:00am * Noon
Charleston Regional Technology Center
1870 Wallace School Road, Charleston, SC

Presenters: Carol Page O’Day, PhD, CCC-SLP, ATP,
SC Assistive Technology Program, USC School of
Medicine, Center for Disability Resources, and
Stacy Springer, MS, OTR/L, ATP, Assistive
Technology Specialist, SC Department of Education

If you are new to using Boardmaker software, or
need more information about the latest version,
this training session is for you. The training
incorporates a combination of hands-on use and
functional application with Boardmaker Plus!
Software. Basic Boardmaker functions and the
additional functions found in the Plus! version
will be reviewed. Boardmaker Plus! is a drawing
program combined with a graphics database that
also has the ability to talk and play recorded
sounds and movies. This interactive component
allows users to create talking activity boards,
worksheets, schedules, books, writing activities, and more.
The training is in a computer lab, so no food or drink please.

Cost: Free! This class has a maximum of 18 participants.

-----------------------

Thursday, October 23, 2008 - Excel with Excel!
8:30am * 12:30pm
Fast Forward Community Technology Center 3223
Devine Street, Columbia Presenter: Elizabeth
Bagley, Ed.D., Client Advocate, Learn.com

This workshop will teach participants how to
utilize some of the features of Microsoft Excel
that often go undiscovered by teachers.
Participants will learn the basics of Excel and
then discover how to transform the standard
spreadsheet into a teaching tool. Excel contains
many features and formulas that, when used
correctly, are beneficial for many students AND teachers.

Students with learning disabilities need to be
careful not to practice incorrect answers. This
workshop will show how Excel can offer students
independent study opportunities and instant
feedback for skill practices across disciplines.
Teachers will learn how to make worksheets to
assist in the tedious and repetitive number
crunching task of averaging grades. Participant’s
role will be interactive and hands-on.

(Note: This workshop is being taught in Excel
2003. Similar features in Excel 2007 may be accessed differently.)

-----------------------

Wednesday, November 5, 2008 - “AAC Goals for Interaction: Talking with Others”
Collaborative Training Center, Midlands Center, Columbia

Presenter: Kristin J. Whitfield, MA, CCC-SLP
Manager, Education Development and Implementation
Training DynaVox and Mayer-Johnson

Description: One common myth of augmentative and
alternative communication (AAC) is that simply
having access to a communication system will make
an individual a successful and independent
communicator. While access to AAC is very
important, it is generally not enough. Rather,
access to AAC must be combined with strategies
that teach the individual how to be a successful
communicator. One important focus for this
teaching revolves around interaction with others.
After all, “the ultimate goal of an AAC
intervention is*to enable individuals to
efficiently and effectively engage in a variety
of interactions and participate in activities of
their choice” (Beukelman & Mirenda, 2005, page 8).

Lecture, discussion, and small group activities
will be used to help participants develop goals
in these areas and strategies to help AAC users
meet these goals. Examples will be provided for
all age groups and communication ability levels.
Attendees will be provided with the opportunity
to begin determining interaction goals and strategies for specific AAC users.

Cost: $75, payable to DynaVox. Check, Credit Card, and PO accepted.
This workshop is limited to 60 attendees.

To access the SCATP web site click on the title above.

Michael Phelps' Mom Shares ADHD Parenting Advice

Image of Michael PhelpsOlympic swimmer, Michael Phelps was diagnosed with ADHD at age 9


"What does it take to succeed despite attention deficit disorder (ADD ADHD)?

It takes hard work, for starters — a willingness to meet challenges head-on. It takes support from family members, teachers, therapists, and coaches. And, of course, it’s hard to overstate the benefits of ADHD medication.

But, of all the ingredients needed to make a happy, successful life, nothing is more important than good parenting. "

To view this entire article, please click the title above.

Monday, August 25, 2008

September is EdCeptional Kids Month!

image of Edventure
During the month of September EdVenture Children's Museum will be celebrating the abilities of children and individuals who are facing life with the challenges of a disability. Throughout the month, special events will be offered in the museum to showcase the talents of children across South Carolina who have soared beyond the restrictions that a disability can create. Through the generosity of donors, children with disabilities and their families will be admitted free on Sundays in September.

SCATP staff members will be there for some of the demonstrations.

Some of the events include:

* Unique art projects for families of children with visual, sensory, developmental disabilities.

* Masks in Motion: an interactive program where masks are revealed as three performers combine African, jazz, modern and world dance in order to explore tolerance through stories from around the world.

* Demonstration of how service dogs can open doors and make life easier for people with physical disabilities.

* Demonstrations of how you can "make your computer speak" and assist you if you are working with disabilities.

* Demonstration by the Rolling ThunderWheelchair Basketball Team.

* Performance by tne South Carolina School for the Deaf and the Blind's choral group.

* Dramatic, musical and improvisational presentations by Carolina Actors with Special Talents, a group that consists of children and adults with cognitive, physical and emotional disabilities.

* Performances by the Special Olympics Cheerleaders.

For more information, please click the title above.

2008 Oticon Focus on People Awards: Call for Nominations

2008 Oticon Focus on People Awards: Call for Nominations

Oticon is seeking nominations for outstanding individuals with any
degree of hearing loss for the 2008 Oticon Focus on People Awards.
The national awards program honors students, adults and volunteers
with hearing loss.

The program offers awards in five categories:
Students for individuals with hearing loss ages 6 to 21 who are
full-time students
Adults for people with hearing loss age 21 and up
Advocacy for adults with hearing loss ages 21 and up who actively
volunteer their time to support those with hearing loss and the deaf community
Practitioner - for hearing care professionals
Pediatric Practitioner - for hearing care professionals in school or
clinical settings

Deadline for nominations is September 8, 2008.

for more information and to download an application, see

http://www.oticonusa.com/oticon/consumers/FOP.html

Thursday, August 21, 2008

Autism Society of America and AMC Entertainment® Host Sensory Friendly Films

Coming Soon to a Theatre Near You!

AMC Entertainment (AMC) and ASA have teamed up to begin testing a pilot program to bring families affected by autism a special opportunity to enjoy their favorite films in a safe and accepting environment on a monthly basis. “Sensory Friendly Films” are premiering across the country this month with a special showing of the new animated film Star Wars: Clone Wars.

Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disability that affects a person’s ability to communicate and interact with others. It often comes with sensory challenges, such as hypersensitivity to light or sound, and children or adults affected by autism may not understand the social boundaries of movie theatre etiquette, such as not talking during the film or sitting still through most of the show.

In order to provide a more accepting and comfortable setting for this unique audience, the movie auditoriums will have their lights brought up and the sound turned down. Additionally, AMC’s “Silence is Golden®” policy will not be enforced unless the safety of the audience is questioned.

Sensory Friendly Films will pilot in 10 markets this month. Tickets prices vary by location and can be purchased on the day of the event. Each event will begin at 10 a.m. local time on August 23 in the following locations:

AMC Dutch Square 14
421 Bush River Road, Unit 80
Columbia, SC 29210

NOTE: To read the original article click the title above.

Tuesday, August 19, 2008

ATTENTION: South Carolina Autism Society Annual Conference

Don't miss the Sc Autism Society's Annual Meeting and Conference October 3-4, 2008, at the Columbia Conference Center, 169 Laurelhurst Avenue, Columbia, SC. More information and registration at www.scautism.org. Scheduled presenters include Dr. Temple Grandin, Diane Twachtman-Cullen, Rose Ivoannone, Laura Carpenter, and Joshua Myers.

NOTE: Click on the title above to go directly to the registration page.

Monday, August 18, 2008

Pro-Parents SC 2008 CALENDAR OF WORKSHOPS


2008 CALENDAR OF WORKSHOPS

THESE WORKSHOPS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC,
LET US KNOW IF YOU NEED ACCOMMODATIONS WHEN REGISTERING.
TO SCHEDULE A WORKSHOP IN YOUR AREA
PLEASE CALL: 1-800-759-4776

8/20/2008
11:00 am - 1:00 pm

Individualized Education Program (IEP) Workshop
McCormick County Library
201 Railroad Avenue
McCormick, SC 29835

Susan Bruce, PRO-Parents of SC
Region 3, Education Coordinator
To register call: 1-800-759-4776 or (803) 772-5688


8/21/2008
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
*

Positive Behavior Intervention (PBI) Workshop
DSS Office
201 South Page Street
Chesterfield, SC

Melinda Hawk, PRO-Parents of SC
South Carolina Special Kids
Project Coordinator
1-866-863-1512


8/22/2008
10:30 am - 2:30 pm

Individualized Education Program (IEP) Workshop
Sumter County Public Library
(Meeting Room)
111 North Harvin Street
Sumter, SC 29150

Tanya M. Inabinet, PRO-Parents of SC
Region 2, Education Coordinator
To register call: 1-800-759-4776 or (803) 772-5688


8/25/2008
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
*

Individualized Education Program (IEP) Workshop
Edgefield DSS
120 W.A. Reel Drive
Edgefield, SC 29824

Melinda Hawk, PRO-Parents of SC
South Carolina Special Kids
Project Coordinator
1-866-863-1512


8/26/2008
5:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Individualized Education Program (IEP) Workshop
Orangeburg Area Mental Health Center
(Use Rear Entrance)
2319 St Matthew Road
Orangeburg, SC 29115

Tanya M. Inabinet, PRO-Parents of SC
Region 2, Education Coordinator
To register call: 1-800-759-4776 or (803) 772-5688


8/26/2008
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
*

Individualized Education Program (IEP) Workshop
DSS Office
2107 Wilson Road
Newberry, SC

Melinda Hawk, PRO-Parents of SC
South Carolina Special Kids
Project Coordinator
1-866-863-1512


8/28/2008
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
*

Individualized Education Program (IEP) Workshop
DSS Office
1401 Eastland Avenue
Kingstree, SC

Melinda Hawk, PRO-Parents of SC
South Carolina Special Kids
Project Coordinator
1-866-863-1512

Friday, August 15, 2008

ATTENTION! Two Up-and-coming Autism Trainings

Behavior Analysis for a Lasting Change
Wednesday, September 3, 2008
9:00am - 4:00pm
registration at 8:00am

Register online at www.scautism.org

Workshop Fee: $65 per person (includes lunch)

Columbia Conference Center
169 Laurelhurst Ave.
Columbia, SC

Cancellation fee of $20 if cancelled before August 27.
No refunds after 8/27.

This workshop is designed to provide, early interventionists,
educators, parents, and others with a thorough understanding of
quality indicators in programs for children with autism and related
disabilities. Strategies for designing individualized learning
programs that can be implemented both at school and home will be
provided. Specific steps in program development, strengthening family
routines, delivery, monitoring, and assessment will be reviewed.
Participants will receive a training handbook that includes
checklists and forms to assist with quality program development and delivery.

Colleen Cornwall, Ph.D, BCBA, founder of Applied Behavioral Learning
Enterprises, is a Nationally Board Certified Behavior Analyst with
over ten years of experience practicing ABA. Colleen holds a Bachelor
of Science Degree in Emotional/Behavioral Disturbances and a Master
of Science in Exceptional Student Education with an emphasis in
Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). As a classroom teacher, Colleen
worked with students with disabilities varying from severe emotional
disorders to mental handicaps. Colleen also served as the Lead
Behavior Analyst for Collier County Public Schools. In this role,
Colleen developed behavioral interventions for children served in all
exceptional student education programs ranging from Pre-K
Developmental Disabilities to Learning Disabled to Autism/Asperger's
Syndrome, providing hands-on training to educators and parents and
individualized behavior therapy to students. As a national
consultant, Colleen has assisted school districts and training
facilities in developing group and individual behavior change
programs, providing assessment, program development and regularly
scheduled consultations. With a particular interest in children and
adults with limited verbal repertoires, Colleen has also been
instrumental in assessing and developing individualized Verbal
Behavior programs for children and adults including assessment
(generally the Assessment of Basic Language and Learning Skills/
ABLLS), program development and regularly scheduled consultations.
Colleen provides services nationwide and abroad.

--------------------------

Mondays, September 15 - October 20 ( see below )
Make and Take sessions Jan-Jun, 2009
3:30 pm-5:30 pm
Workshop Fee: $20*
*This workshop will be offered without cost to parents that would be
willing to help others from time to time to learn these skills.

The South Carolina Autism Society, in collaboration with the South
Carolina Assistive Technology Project (SCATP), will offer a series of
skill-building sessions this fall. Carol Page, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, ATP
will present a series on visual and environmental supports in the
areas of social skills and behavior, communication, literacy, and
free electronic resources.

The training is targeted to parents of individuals with an autism
spectrum disorder (ASD) but instructional assistants, teachers, and
others certainly may attend.

SCAS will tap into the power of parents teaching other parents with
ongoing make and take opportunities during the school year. This will
be to support people with ASD across school and home environments in
order to enhance the quality of life for children with ASDs. The
majority of the trainings will be held at the SCAS's training room,
located at 806 12th Street, West Columbia, South Carolina.

The cost for this entire training series is $20.00 but will be
offered without cost to parents that would be willing to help others
from time to time to learn these skills. The training is limited to
15 participants. The times for all sessions will be 3:30-5:30 pm. To
register go www.scautism.org or call 803-750-6988.

Thursday, August 14, 2008

Splash Bash Sept 8th

HealthSouth Columbia 2008
1ST ANNUAL SPLASH BASH
with Adaptive Services by HealthSouth Columbia
SEPTEMBER 6, 2008
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
at the
SHAW AIR FORCE BASE
Lake Wateree Recreation Area
2030 Baron DeKalb Road • Camden, SC
Michelle Azarigian-Rogers, 803-401-1345
www.healthsouthcolumbia.com

SWIM, PLAY & LEISURE

WATER SPORTS, FISHING, ACCESS TO ADAPTIVE EQUIPMENT
FOR HUNTING AND OTHER WHEELCHAIR SPORTS
ADAPTED SPORTS & LEISURE ACTIVITIES FOR ADULTS and
YOUNG ADULTS (14 years & older) WITH DISABILITIES...
A variety of organizations & vendors will be
present to provide their expertise & services.

FOR FREE REGISTRATION AND OTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
Michelle Azarigian-Rogers, 803-401-1345
www.healthsouthcolumbia.com

NOTE: Click on the title above to go to the web site.

Tuesday, August 12, 2008

Helping The Deaf Hear Acoustic Device Allows Sound To Travel Through Bones

ScienceDaily Disability News--

Otolaryngologists develop a new, implantable hearing aid. It works with a transmitter worn behind the ear that sends sound vibrations from her deaf side through the skull to her good ear. It's called the BAHA. The device is implanted in the skull through the scalp behind the ear and causes a vibration when sound enters the field which vibrates the entire skull.

Hearing with your bones? It may seem like the stuff of science fiction, but a new device is allowing some partially deaf patients to do just that.

NOTE: To read the entire article, click on the title above.

Monday, August 11, 2008

Save the Date! North Carolina Assistive Technology Expo

North Carolina Assistive Technology Expo

When: Pre-conference December 3, 2008
AT Expo December 4-5, 2008
Where: North Raleigh Hilton Raleigh, NC

Conference offerings include an exhibit hall (free), 40 concurrent
sessions, pre- conference sessions, poster session and a Keynote address.

NOTE: Click on the title above to access the North Carolina Assistive Technology Web page.

Friday, August 08, 2008

Robotics Research: Enhancing The Lives Of People With Disabilities

ScienceDaily (Aug. 7, 2008)

Robots may be the solution for people with disabilities who are struggling to regain the use of their limbs, thanks to a research team that includes engineers and students from Rochester Institute of Technology.

The study utilizes physiological information, or bio-signals, produced by the human body, to improve the performance of external assistive devices, called orthoses, which aid individuals with physical disabilities, such as strokes or major spinal cord injuries, regain the use of there arms and legs.

The project is funded through the National Science Foundation Computer, Information Science and Engineering Directorate and includes researchers and students from Rochester Institute of Technology, Georgia Tech, and Georgetown University.

NOTE: To read the entire article, click on the title above.

Thursday, August 07, 2008

Stretchable Silicon Camera Next Step To Artificial Retina

The electronic-eye camera developed by researchers from the
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Northwestern
University. The array of pixels is visible through the
magnified image created by the lens.
(Credit: Beckman Institute, University of Illinois)

ScienceDaily (Aug. 7, 2008)


"Digital cameras have transformed the world of photography. Now new technology inspired by the human eye could push the photographic image farther forward by producing improved images with a wider field of view. By combining stretchable optoelectronics and biologically inspired design, scientists have created a remarkable imaging device, with a layout based on the human eye.

As reported in the Aug. 7 issue of the journal Nature, researchers at the University of Illinois and Northwestern University have developed a high-performance, hemispherical "eye" camera using an array of single-crystalline silicon detectors and electronics, configured in a stretchable, interconnected mesh.

The work opens new possibilities for advanced camera design. It also foreshadows artificial retinas for bionic eyes similar in concept to those in the movie "Terminator" and other popular science fiction.

NOTE: To read the entire article, click on the title above."

Wednesday, August 06, 2008

Lens implant offers chance at beating lazy eye

AP Photo: Dr. Paul Dougherty inserts a rolled-up intraocular
lens implant through a tiny incision in the...

"WASHINGTON - Dr. Paul Dougherty delicately slipped a tiny lens inside the right eye of 7-year-old Megan Garvin — a last-ditch shot at saving her sight in that eye.

The California girl last week became one of a small number of U.S. children to try an experimental surgery to prevent virtual blindness from lazy eye diagnosed too late, or too severe, for standard treatment.

The new approach: Implantable lenses, the same kind that nearsighted adults can have inserted for crisper vision — but that aren't officially approved for use in children.

"Without this technology, we couldn't help her," says Dougherty, a prominent Los Angeles eye surgeon who invited The Associated Press to document Megan's surgery. "This would be written off as a blind eye."

Up to 5 percent of children have amblyopia, commonly called lazy eye, where one eye is so much stronger than the other that the brain learns to ignore the weaker eye. Untreated, the proper neural connections for vision don't form, eventually rendering that eye useless."

NOTE: To read the entire article, click on the title above.

Tuesday, August 05, 2008

Multiple Sclerosis: New MRI Contrast Medium Enables Early Diagnosis In Animal Model

ScienceDaily (Aug. 4, 2008)

In an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), neuroradiologists and neurologists of the University hospitals of Heidelberg and W├╝rzburg have been able to visualize inflammatory tissue damage, most of which had remained unrecognized up to now, with the aid of a new contrast medium, Gadofluorine M, in magnetic resonance imaging.

In particular at the early stage of the disease, drug treatment is effective. Up to now, how-ever, an early diagnosis is frequently not established with certainty, especially if no (or very few) inflammatory lesions are present on MRI. "With this new contrast medium, we were able to visualize five to ten times more foci of inflammation in comparison to conventional MRI images and contrast media", reports Professor Dr. Martin Bendszus, Medical Director of the Department of Neuroradiology at the University hospital of Heidelberg.

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Monday, August 04, 2008

Book Club for Intellectually Disabled

"When Jamie Comer graduated from high school at age 21, gone were the in-depth assignments and hours of homework that had long challenged him.

As Comer, who has Down syndrome, began to gradually lose critical thinking skills without the aid of vigorous schoolwork, his mother struggled to find opportunities to keep him mentally sharp.

"People have always assumed that people like Jamie don't really have opinions on anything remotely complex," said his mother, Nancy Comer, 64, of Port Washington. "They're just expected to work and be happy."

But Nancy Comer wanted more for her son, now 29, and other adults with developmental disabilities. Five years ago, with the help of like-minded advocates and the Port Washington Public Library, she formed Books for Dessert, a book club - thought to be the only one of its kind on Long Island - for adults with intellectual disabilities.

The program allows developmentally disabled adults to read books together, discuss the intricacies of plots and character motivations and compare the stories to their own lives. Conversations, Comer said, have drifted from what it means to be poor to why President George W. Bush doesn't have the authority to behead, as did England's King Henry VIII."

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Friday, August 01, 2008

ATTENTION! South Carolina Assistive Technology Program on the LaMondre Pough radio show

The South Carolina Assistive Technology Program will be the guest on
The LaMondre' Pough Show Empowerment Radio, on August 2, 2008. The
show focuses on empowering those with and without disabilities to
live life without limits, and will highlight the good works offered
by this organization. The show airs on WGCV 620 AM at 1:00pm. We
encourage you to call in with your comments and stories. Please tune
in and support this event each and every Saturday. Thanks in advance
for your support.

New Website Helps Doctors and Dentists Locate Disability Insurance

Doctor Disability recently launched a redesigned website that allows physicians and dentists to request disability insurance quotes, compare quotes, and get custom disability insurance plans.

San Clemente, CA (PRWEB) July 31, 2008 -- Doctor Disability, a disability insurance and life insurance brokerage service, recently launched a redesigned website where physicians and dentists can more easily request disability insurance quotes from various providers. DoctorDisability.com provides an easy way to compare quotes from different disability insurance companies, and even allows doctors and dentists to build their own custom disability insurance plans based on their unique needs.

"Locating adequate disability insurance usually means doing a lot of the footwork yourself," said Charles Krugh, president of Doctor Disability. "Our website essentially creates a one-stop shop environment, where doctors and dentists can easily obtain everything they need from one place."

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